Recipes for Disease and Infertility: USDA Dietary Guidelines

Once again this summer, the local hospital and health departments will offer their dietary and health advice to the public at farmers markets and county fairs. All too frequently, a very obese dietician serves up the government-fed formula– her weight indicating she has taken too much of her own medicine.

Those most responsible for soaring rates of new diseases, obesity and neurological conditions; and those most responsible for our  jail, school and hospital menus and low-quality food supply, are  expecting us to trust them with new, “improved” revised dietary guidelines promising us more of the same. The following news release today is about the upside-down Food Pyramid of the USDA– backed by the corporate/government health and food industries.– Augie

PROPOSED 2010 USDA DIETARY GUIDELINES –A RECIPE FOR CHRONIC DISEASE

Weston A. Price Foundation Proposes a Return to Four Basic Groups of Nutrient-Dense Foods

WASHINGTON, DC, June 23, 2010: The proposed 2010 USDA Dietary Guidelines are a recipe for infertility, learning problems in children and increased chronic disease in all age groups according to Sally Fallon Morell, president of the Weston A. Price Foundation.

 “The proposed 2010 Dietary Guidelines perpetuate the mistakes of previous guidelines in demonizing saturated fats and animal foods rich in saturated fatty acids such as egg yolks, butter, whole milk, cheese, fatty meats like bacon and animal fats for cooking. The current obesity epidemic emerged as vegetable oils and refined carbohydrates replaced these healthy, nutrient-dense traditional fats. Animal fats supply many essential nutrients that are difficult to obtain from other sources,” explains Fallon Morell. 

  “The revised Guidelines recommend even more stringent reductions in animal fats and cholesterol than previous versions,” says Fallon Morell, “and are tantamount to rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. While the ship of state sinks under the weight of a crippling health care burden, the Committee members are giving us more of the same disastrous advice.  These are unscientific and grossly deficient dietary recommendations.”

 The Weston A. Price Foundation is a non-profit nutrition education foundation with no ties to the government or food processing industries.  Named for Dr. Weston A. Price, whose  pioneering research discovered the vital importance of animal fats in human diets, the Foundation has warned against the dangers of lowfat and plant-based diets.

 “Basic biochemistry shows that the human body has a very high requirement for saturated fats in all cell membranes; if we do not eat saturated fats, the body will simply make them from carbohydrates, but excess carbohydrate increases blood levels of triglyceride and small, dense LDL, and compromises blood vessel function,” says Fallon Morell.  “Moreover, high-carbohydrate diets do not satisfy the appetite as well as diets rich in traditional fats, leading to higher caloric intakes and often to bingeing and splurging on empty foods, resulting in rapid weight gain and chronic disease.”

 The proposed guidelines will perpetuate existing nutrient deficiencies present in all American population groups, including deficiencies in vitamins A and D found in animal fats, vitamins B12 and B6 found in animal foods, as well as minerals like calcium and phosphorus, which require vitamins A and D for assimilation. Moreover, low intakes of vitamin K2, are associated with increased risk of heart disease and cancer. The main sources of vitamin K2 available to Americans are egg yolks and full-fat cheese. Incredibly, the Guidelines single out cheese as an unhealthy food!

 Fallon Morell notes that by restricting healthy animal fats in school lunches and diets for pregnant women and growing children, the Guidelines will accelerate the tragic epidemic of learning and behavior disorders.  The nutrients found most abundantly in animal fats and organ meats—including choline, cholesterol and arachidonic acid—are critical for the development of the brain and the function of receptors that modulate thinking and behavior.  Studies show that choline helps the brain make critical connections and protects against neurotoxins; animal studies suggest that if choline is abundant during developmental years, the individual is protected for life from developmental decline. The National Academy of Sciences recommends 375 mg per day for children nine through thirteen years of age, 450 mg for pregnant women and 550 mg for lactating women and men aged fourteen and older. These amounts are provided by four or five egg yolks per day—but that would entail consuming 800-1000 mg cholesterol, a crime by USDA standards. In their deliberations, the committee referred to this as the “choline problem.” Pregnant women and growing children especially need to eat as many egg yolks as possible—yet the Guidelines demonize this nutrient-dense food.

 The Guidelines lump trans fats together with saturated fats—calling them Solid Fats—thereby hiding the difference between unhealthy industrial trans fats and healthy traditional saturated fats.  Trans fats contribute to inflammation, depress the immune system, interfere with hormone production, and set up pathological conditions leading to cancer and heart disease, whereas saturated fats fight inflammation, support the immune system, support hormone production and protect against cancer and heart disease.

 The vitamins and fatty acids carried uniquely in saturated animal fats are critical to reproduction.  The Weston A. Price Foundation warns that the 2010 Guidelines will increase infertility in this country, already at tragically high rates.

“The 2010 proposed Guidelines represent a national scandal, the triumph of industry clout over good science and common sense,” says Fallon Morell. “It must be emphasized that the Guidelines are not based on science but are designed to promote the products of commodity agriculture and—through the back door—encourage the consumption of processed foods. For while the USDA food police pay lip service to reducing our intake of refined sweeteners, trans fats, white flour and salt, this puritanical low-fat prescription ultimately leads to cravings for chips, sweets, sodas, breads, desserts and other empty food-and-beverage-like products just loaded with refined sweeteners, trans fats, white flour and salt.”

 The Weston A. Price Foundation proposes alternative Healthy 4 Life Dietary Guidelines, which harkens back to the traditional four basic food groups, but with a renewed emphasis on quality through a return to pasture-based feeding and organic, pesticide-free production methods:

 Every day, eat high quality, whole foods to provide an abundance of nutrients, chosen from each of the following four groups: 

1.       Animal foods: meat and organ meats, poultry, and eggs from pastured animals; fish and shellfish; whole raw cheese, milk and other dairy products from pastured animals; and broth made from animal bones.

 2.       Grains, legumes and nuts: whole-grain baked goods, breakfast porridges, whole grain rice; beans and lentils; peanuts, cashews and nuts, properly prepared to improve digestibility.

 3.       Fruits and Vegetables: preferably fresh or frozen, preferably locally grown, either raw, cooked or in soups and stews, and also as lacto-fermented condiments.

 4.       Fats and Oils: unrefined saturated and monounsaturated fats including butter, lard, tallow and other animal fats; palm oil and coconut oil; olive oil; cod liver oil for vitamins A and D.

 Avoid: foods containing refined sweeteners such as candies, sodas, cookies, cakes etc.; white flour products such as pasta and white bread; processed foods; modern soy foods; polyunsaturated and partially hydrogenated vegetable oils and fried foods.

 The Weston A. Price Foundation is a 501C3 nutrition education foundation with the mission of disseminating accurate, science-based information on diet and health. Named after nutrition pioneer Weston A. Price, DDS, author of Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, the Washington, DC-based Foundation publishes a quarterly journal for its 13,000 members, supports 450 local chapters worldwide and hosts a yearly International conference. The Foundation headquarters phone number is (202) 363-4394, www.westonaprice.org, info@westonaprice.org.

CONTACT: Kimberly Hartke, Publicist

Home office 703-860-2711 cell 703-675-5557

press@westonaprice.org

__________________________________

COMMENTS AND ACTIONS TO TAKE:

Additional comments and actions to take are also provided by The Weston A Price Foundation:

USDA has issued draft Dietary Guidelines for 2010.  Rather than correct its anti-saturated fat and anti-cholesterol position, which has led to an epidemic of disease in this country, the new Guidelines are worse than ever, with more stringent restriction of saturated fat (7 percent of total calories, down from 10 percent) and cholesterol consumption of less than 300 mg per day (less than 200 mg for those with risk factors for heart disease or diabetes–one egg contains about 245 mg cholesterol), and reduction of salt intake from 2.3 grams to 1.5 grams (about one-fourth teaspoon).

The guidelines sweep the dangers of trans fat under the rug by lumping them with saturated fats, using the term “solid fats” for both, promote an increase in difficult-to-digest whole grains, and recommend lean meats and lowfat dairy products.  Cheese is specifically singled out for avoidance because of its high “solid fat” content. Since, as the Committee admits, no one follows earlier versions of the Guidelines, it is recommending a focus on “actions needed to successfully implement” key recommendations, in other words on how to force people to eat in this highly deficient and grossly unsatisfying way.

ACTIONS TO TAKE
1. Please take time during this week to post a comment at the USDA website. Go to http://www.dietaryguidelines.gov and scroll down to “SUBMIT Written Comments.”  It is particularly important to describe any adverse health effects you or family members have suffered by following earlier versions of the Guidelines. You may also want to use any of the talking points listed below.

2. Please also EMAIL your comments to your Senators and Representative in Congress.  Let them know that USDA’s formulation of dietary guidelines is a complete waste of taxpayer money and has resulted in a health crisis of epidemic proportions, especially in our children. It would be good also to PHONE your elected officials as well. For congressional contact information, go to http://www.house.gov and http://www.senate.gov.

3. If you live near Washington, DC, consider attending the public hearings at USDA on July 8.  You can sign up to give an oral presentation (as I will do) or simply attend to show support.  To sign up for attending the meeting, go to http://www.dietaryguidelines.gov and scroll down to “Meeting Registration/Oral Testimony.”

4. Please send out the Press Release below to your local newspaper and radio shows.  You may add your own contact information to that of our publicist Kimberly Hartke.  In addition, you may add a paragraph to the press release about how the USDA dietary guidelines adversely affected your own health and that of your family.

5.Please broadcast this action alert to other groups. Let’s create a tidal wave of outrage!

TALKING POINTS

1. The proposed 2010 Dietary Guidelines perpetuate the mistakes of previous guidelines in demonizing saturated fats and animal foods rich in saturated fatty acids such as egg yolks, butter, whole milk, cheese, fatty meats like bacon and animal fats for cooking. The current obesity epidemic emerged as vegetable oils and refined carbohydrates replaced these healthy, nutrient-dense traditional fats. Animal fats supply many essential nutrients that are difficult to obtain from other sources.

2. When a healthy food like cheese is singled out as a food to be avoided, there must be something wrong with the premises on which the guidelines are based. 

3. Basic biochemistry shows that the human body has a very high requirement for saturated fats in all cell membranes; if we do not eat saturated fats, the body will simply make them from carbohydrates.  But excess carbohydrate increases blood levels of triglyceride and small, dense LDL, and compromises blood vessel function.  Moreover, high-carbohydrate diets do not satisfy the appetite as well as diets rich in traditional fats, leading to higher caloric intakes and often to bingeing and splurging on empty foods, resulting in rapid weight gain and chronic disease.

4. The proposed guidelines will perpetuate existing nutrient deficiencies present in all American population groups, including deficiencies in vitamins A and D found in animal fats, vitamins B12 and B6 found in animal foods, as well as minerals like calcium and phosphorus, which require vitamins A and D for assimilation. Moreover, low intakes of vitamin K2, are associated with increased risk of heart disease and cancer. The main sources of vitamin K2 available to Americans are egg yolks and full-fat cheese.

5. By restricting healthy animal fats in school lunches and diets for pregnant women and growing children, the Guidelines will perpetuate the tragic epidemic of learning and behavior disorders.  The nutrients found most abundantly in animal fats and organ meats-including choline, cholesterol and arachidonic acid-are critical for the development of the brain and the function of receptors that modulate thinking and behavior.  Studies show that choline helps the brain make critical connections and protects against neurotoxins; animal studies suggest that if choline is abundant during developmental years, the individual is protected for life from developmental decline.

6. The National Academy of Sciences recommends 375 mg of choline per day for children nine through thirteen years of age, 450 mg for pregnant women and 550 mg for lactating women and men aged fourteen and older. These amounts are provided by four or five egg yolks per day-but that would entail consuming 800-1000 mg cholesterol, a crime by USDA standards. The committee referred to this as the “choline problem.” Pregnant women and growing children especially need to eat as many egg yolks as possible-yet the Guidelines demonize this nutrient-dense food.

7. The Guidelines lump trans fats together with saturated fats-calling them Solid Fats-thereby hiding the difference between unhealthy industrial trans fats and healthy traditional saturated fats.  Trans fats contribute to inflammation, depress the immune system, interfere with hormone production, and set up pathological conditions leading to cancer and heart disease, whereas saturated fats fight inflammation, support the immune system, support hormone production and protect against cancer and heart disease.

8. The vitamins and fatty acids carried uniquely in saturated animal fats are critical to reproduction.  The 2010 Guidelines will increase infertility in this country, already at tragically high rates.

9. The Guidelines are not based on science but are designed to promote the products of commodity agriculture and-through the back door-encourage the consumption of processed foods.

10. The Guidelines promote the consumption of whole grains, which can contribute to digestive disorders unless properly prepared.

11. The Guidelines completely avoid mentioning blood sugar problems caused by a diet high in carbohydrates and low in fat; the diet is particularly dangerous for those suffering from diabetes or hypoglycemia, since fats help regulate blood sugar levels. Many people have difficulty concentrating or can even suffer from seizures on a diet too low in fat.

12. The Guidelines urge salt restriction, which will lead to an increased use of artificial flavors like MSG in processed foods.

13. The Guidelines should be scrapped and the committee members should be replaced with individuals who have no ties to the food processing industry or to universities that accept funding from the food processing industry.

PRESS RELEASE

PROPOSED 2010 USDA DIETARY GUIDELINES –A RECIPE FOR CHRONIC DISEASE
Weston A. Price Foundation Proposes a Return to Four Basic Groups of Nutrient-Dense Foods

WASHINGTON, DC, June 21, 2010: The proposed 2010 USDA Dietary Guidelines are a recipe for infertility, learning problems in children and increased chronic disease in all age groups according to Sally Fallon Morell, president of the Weston A. Price Foundation.

“The proposed 2010 Dietary Guidelines perpetuate the mistakes of previous guidelines in demonizing saturated fats and animal foods rich in saturated fatty acids such as egg yolks, butter, whole milk, cheese, fatty meats like bacon and animal fats for cooking. The current obesity epidemic emerged as vegetable oils and refined carbohydrates replaced these healthy, nutrient-dense traditional fats. Animal fats supply many essential nutrients that are difficult to obtain from other sources,” explains Fallon Morell. 

“The revised Guidelines recommend even more stringent reductions in animal fats and cholesterol than previous versions,” says Fallon Morell, “and are tantamount to rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. While the ship of state sinks under the weight of a crippling health care burden, the Committee members are giving us more of the same disastrous advice.  These are unscientific and grossly deficient dietary recommendations.”

The Weston A. Price Foundation is a non-profit nutrition education foundation with no ties to the government or food processing industries.  Named for Dr. Weston A. Price, whose  pioneering research discovered the vital importance of animal fats in human diets, the Foundation has warned against the dangers of lowfat and plant-based diets.

“Basic biochemistry shows that the human body has a very high requirement for saturated fats in all cell membranes; if we do not eat saturated fats, the body will simply make them from carbohydrates, but excess carbohydrate increases blood levels of triglyceride and small, dense LDL, and compromises blood vessel function,” says Fallon Morell.  “Moreover, high-carbohydrate diets do not satisfy the appetite as well as diets rich in traditional fats, leading to higher caloric intakes and often to bingeing and splurging on empty foods, resulting in rapid weight gain and chronic disease.”

The proposed guidelines will perpetuate existing nutrient deficiencies present in all American population groups, including deficiencies in vitamins A and D found in animal fats, vitamins B12 and B6 found in animal foods, as well as minerals like calcium and phosphorus, which require vitamins A and D for assimilation. Moreover, low intakes of vitamin K2, are associated with increased risk of heart disease and cancer. The main sources of vitamin K2 available to Americans are egg yolks and full-fat cheese. Incredibly, the Guidelines single out cheese as an unhealthy food!

Fallon Morell notes that by restricting healthy animal fats in school lunches and diets for pregnant women and growing children, the Guidelines will accelerate the tragic epidemic of learning and behavior disorders.  The nutrients found most abundantly in animal fats and organ meats-including choline, cholesterol and arachidonic acid-are critical for the development of the brain and the function of receptors that modulate thinking and behavior.  Studies show that choline helps the brain make critical connections and protects against neurotoxins; animal studies suggest that if choline is abundant during developmental years, the individual is protected for life from developmental decline. The National Academy of Sciences recommends 375 mg per day for children nine through thirteen years of age, 450 mg for pregnant women and 550 mg for lactating women and men aged fourteen and older. These amounts are provided by four or five egg yolks per day-but that would entail consuming 800-1000 mg cholesterol, a crime by USDA standards. In their deliberations, the committee referred to this as the “choline problem.” Pregnant women and growing children especially need to eat as many egg yolks as possible-yet the Guidelines demonize this nutrient-dense food.

The Guidelines lump trans fats together with saturated fats-calling them Solid Fats-thereby hiding the difference between unhealthy industrial trans fats and healthy traditional saturated fats.  Trans fats contribute to inflammation, depress the immune system, interfere with hormone production, and set up pathological conditions leading to cancer and heart disease, whereas saturated fats fight inflammation, support the immune system, support hormone production and protect against cancer and heart disease.

The vitamins and fatty acids carried uniquely in saturated animal fats are critical to reproduction.  The Weston A. Price Foundation warns that the 2010 Guidelines will increase infertility in this country, already at tragically high rates.

“The 2010 proposed Guidelines represent a national scandal, the triumph of industry clout over good science and common sense,” says Fallon Morell. “It must be emphasized that the Guidelines are not based on science but are designed to promote the products of commodity agriculture and-through the back door-encourage the consumption of processed foods. For while the USDA food police pay lip service to reducing our intake of refined sweeteners, trans fats, white flour and salt, this puritanical low-fat prescription ultimately leads to cravings for chips, sweets, sodas, breads, desserts and other empty food-and-beverage-like products just loaded with refined sweeteners, trans fats, white flour and salt.”

The Weston A. Price Foundation proposes alternative Healthy 4 Life Dietary Guidelines, which harkens back to the traditional four basic food groups, but with a renewed emphasis on quality through a return to pasture-based feeding and organic, pesticide-free production methods:

Every day, eat high quality, whole foods to provide an abundance of nutrients, chosen from each of the following four groups:

ANIMAL FOODS: meat and organ meats, poultry, and eggs from pastured animals; fish and shellfish; whole raw cheese, milk and other dairy products from pastured animals; and broth made from animal bones.

GRAINS, LEGUMES AND NUTS: whole-grain baked goods, breakfast porridges, whole grain rice; beans and lentils; peanuts, cashews and nuts, properly prepared to improve digestibility.

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES: preferably fresh or frozen, preferably locally grown, either raw, cooked or in soups and stews, and also as lacto-fermented condiments.

FATS AND OILS: unrefined saturated and monounsaturated fats including butter, lard, tallow and other animal fats; palm oil and coconut oil; olive oil; cod liver oil for vitamins A and D.

AVOID: foods containing refined sweeteners such as candies, sodas, cookies, cakes, etc.; white flour products such as pasta and white bread; processed foods; modern soy foods; polyunsaturated and partially hydrogenated vegetable oils and fried foods.

* * * * * * * * *

The Weston A. Price Foundation is a 501C3 nutrition education foundation with the mission of disseminating accurate, science-based information on diet and health. Named after nutrition pioneer Weston A. Price, DDS, author of Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, the Washington, DC-based Foundation publishes a quarterly journal for its 13,000 members, supports 450 local chapters worldwide and hosts a yearly International conference. The Foundation headquarters phone number is (202) 363-4394, http://www.westonaprice.org, info@westonaprice.org.

CONTACT: Kimberly Hartke, Publicist
Home office 703-860-2711 cell 703-675-5557
press@westonaprice.org

7 responses to “Recipes for Disease and Infertility: USDA Dietary Guidelines

  1. You might want to check out this excellent history of the evolution of the ADA diet (& the food pyramid). http://www.hawkeshealth.net/community/showthread.php?t=4295

  2. Here is what Kathryne Pirtle said over at http://performancewithoutpain.com

    The “new” USDA dietary guidelines are really not new at all. They continue the 60 year experiment of moving people away from nutrient-dense foods. All indications–from the record numbers of adults and children who are chronically ill, the ever increasing percentages of children with autism, ADD, ADHD and mental health disorders–the enormous statistics of infertility–point to this dictate as a complete failure. Yet, why not keep telling people to continue to eat this way? Let’s continue to line the pockets of the the corporate giants behind these insane guidelines.

    Luckily, I was able to crawl out alive from my low fat/high fiber experiment, which lead to 25 years of chronic pain and a life-threatening digestive disorder. I found the truth of what really fuels the human body–real food from animals eating their natural diets–traditional fats–bone broth soups–unprocessed dairy–cultured foods–fermented cod liver oil–the infallible work of Dr. Weston A. Price–foods from small family farms that were eaten for thousands of years–foods that are not a part of a food supply produced by an industrial farming industry.

    You can’t fool Mother Nature. Yet–our government thinks it may be possible. They think maybe people won’t notice. However, people are getting a lot smarter today. They are sick and tired of being sick and tired. It’s time to remove from government those who think “business as usual” is acceptable. When “business as usual” continues to severely damage an entire population–we must remove those who practice this kind of usual business.

  3. I just read the recommendations for breastfeeding mothers and that is guaranteed to set them up for failure to thrive. Way too little fat intake, so the baby will not get enough either.
    I am appalled by this.

    And then low fat or fat free for kids. I am glad I am living at the other side of the ocean, hopefully they will not go this crazy over here.

  4. I don’t really disagree with your diet suggestions. Isn’t it kind of a cheap shot to call the dietician fat?

    • I did not call her fat– I called her very obese– the proper word the dieticians use. I suppose it is also correct to call that excess fat– fats– which is also the proper term for the chemicals that make it up. But I chose the word “obese” rather than fat– so as to avoid upsetting those that are overly sensitive to the use of that term.

  5. In http://hartkeisonline.com/2010/06/29/dietetics-association-seeks-to-monopolize-nutrition-field/

    Sylvia Onusic commented:

    It is our right to teach our families and others about nutrition. As Tim Wightman said at the “Second Raw Milk Symposium,” we have to take back our rights: freedom of Speech, government of the people, for the people and by the people. It is not up to the government to tell us to whom we must refer for nutrition information- it is the choice of the individual.

    Being from among the ranks, I can tell you that people can have their licenses taken away if they teach about natural foods. Becoming a RD involves completing the coursework, a lengthy internship, an exam, and towing the party line which involves recommending only industrial ag products.

    In the internship, from 6 months to a year, the students must focus mainly on the hospital, learning about the artificial products used in clinical dietetics. For example, when a feeding tube patient needs mid-chain fatty acids, which are essential for life, they are prescribed a gooey artificial mix instead of just natural coconut oil. The remainder of the internship time can be spent in various venues, depending on the program. Maybe then you go to WIC, to do a “community component.” WIC is the government program for pregnant women, babies and children, which, like the RD program, supports Big Ag.
    You can get tofu, tofu, and more tofu for your baby with your WIC card. WIC and school lunch programs are the dumping ground for all the surplus corn, wheat, soy, which the government pays farmers to grow, using Monsanto’s “Round-up” pesticides. But, on the other hand, you can use your WIC card at farmers markets.

    Many RD’s are not healthy, are extremely thin, and some have problems with eating. One instructor I had at Penn State who taught counseling, which was, by the way, a 1 credit course (the only required counseling course), was bulimic, and became almost hysterical when I insisted that cheese is a healthy food. She also could not tolerate the idea that sea salt was necessary in a healthy diet. Counseling was by rote- and all clients were counseled basically the same, low fat, low fat, low fat, to converge with the current cholesterol paradigm. Another professor, who taught “Diet Therapy,” the major course in this program, wrote on one of my projects, :”Why give children organic food, it is so expensive?” She was also the one who defended rBST (Bovine Growth Hormone) when I brought it up in class and who didnt know why carbohydrates produced triglycerides.

    The reference books are geared towards processed foods. When a student is asked to break down foods in the client’s diet to make sure the client is getting the “RDA,” the major reference we were required to use listed only boxed, canned and other ready-to-eat items. This reference is a”classic” in the dietetics field.

    They are “pushing” soybeans in all possible ways, artificial sweeteners, and low fat, low fat, low fat- there is no such thing as GMO’s. Indeed we call Penn State, a big Ag school, Monsanto U. And that is what they are teaching the future RD’s, the only so-called health professionals that are to teach us about nutrition. The RD’s and RN’s are trained to be the handmaidens of the physicians, the pharmaceutical, Big Ag, and the medical supply industries.

    A student could not complete a project using traditional foods. She has to announce understanding of the current RD dogma. The professors are there to see to that. Some professors at Penn State in the Nutrition Dept only teach one course per semester. The rest of their time is spent on research. And this is considered one of the “prima” nutrition programs in the country.

    Sylvia

  6. I’ve been eating low carb on the Atkins way of living for the past 5 years or so. After I started the diet, I really enjoyed the extra energy I have while eating low carb and it has increased my blood chemistry as well! I’m very thankful to Dr. Atkins. I would really recommend it to anyone looking to adopt a new healthy way of living.

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